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University History Research Guide: Buildings and Grounds

A guide to the history of The University of Montana-Missoula.

Overview of UM Grounds and Buildings

architectural drawing of Main Hall

Over the 125 years, the University of Montana campus has evolved and expanded. In 1893, when the university was established by the state legislature, it owned no land. In 1898, the first permanent building, Main Hall, was constructed. Today, the campus has grown to over 120 acres, and the landscape includes features like Memorial Row, the M on Mount Sentinel, and the Oval.

Building Timeline

The buildings in this list have been sorted chronologically by the date they were originally built. Click on the thumbnails below to see a larger image of the building.


 1897  

Prescott House

Prescott House

 
   
 1898  
Science Hall

Science Hall

University-Main Hall

University-Main Hall

   
 1903  
Gym

Gym

Math Building

Math Building

   
 1908  
Jeannette Rankin Hall

Jeannette Rankin Hall

 
   
 1915  
Forestry Shack

Forestry Shack

 
   
 1918  
Cook Hall

Cook Hall

Natural Science Building

Natural Science Building

Simpkins Hall

Simpkins Hall

Old Native American Studies

Old Native American Studies

   
 1921  
Schreiber Gym

Schreiber Gym

Social Sciences Building

Social Sciences Building

Home Economics Home Living Center

Home Economics Home Living Center

 
   
 1922  
Forestry Building

Forestry Building

Heating Plant

Heating Plant

   
 1923  
Brantly Hall

Brantly Hall

Elrod Hall

Elrod Hall

   
 1927  
Corbin Hall

Corbin Hall

 
   
 1935  
Fine Arts Building

Fine Arts Building

 
 1936  
Old Journalism

Old Journalism

 
   
 1937  
International Center

International Center

Turner Hall

Turner Hall

   
 1938  
Natural Science Annex

Natural Science Annex

 
   
 1939  
Chemistry Building

Chemistry Building

 
   
 1946  
Jumbo Hall

Jumbo Hall

 
   
 1950  
Education Center

Phyllis J. Washington Education Center

 
   
 1951  
Forestry Memorial Greenhouse

Forestry Memorial Greenhouse

 
   
 1953  
Adams Center

Adams Center

Craig Hall

Craig Hall

Liberal Arts Building

Liberal Arts Building

McGill Hall

McGill Hall

Music Building

Music Building

 
   
 1955  
Lommasson Center

Lommasson Center

 
   
 1956  
Curry Health Center

Curry Health Center

Duniway Hall

Duniway Hall

Ice Rink

Ice Rink

North Corbin Hall

North Corbin Hall

   
 1957  
Craighead Apartments

Craighead Apartments

Sisson Apartments

Sisson Apartments

   
 1958  
Art Annex-Pool

Art Annex-Pool

 
   
 1961  
Health Sciences

Health Sciences

Law Building

Law Building

   
 1963  
Knowles Hall

Knowles Hall

 
   
 1965  
Miller Hall

Miller Hall

 
   
 1966  
Elliot Village

Elliot Village

 
   
 1967  
Aber Hall

Aber Hall

Jesse Hall

Jesse Hall

Physial Plant

Physical Plant

 
   
 1968  
University Center

University Center

 
   
 1970  
Veterans Education & Transition Building

Veterans Education & Transition Building

 
   
 1971  
Clapp Building

Clapp Building

 
   
 1972  
Student Recreation Center

Student Recreation Center

 
   
 1973  
Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library

Maureen & Mike Mansfield Library

 
   
 1981  
Skaggs-Pharmacy Building

Skaggs Pharmacy Building

Urey Lecture Hall

Urey Lecture Hall

   
 1983  
Clinical Psychology Center

Clinical Psychology Center

PARTV

PARTV (Performing Arts Radio Television) Building

   
 1986  
Washington Grizzly Stadium

Washington Grizzly Stadium

 
   
 1995  
Pantzer Hall

Pantzer Hall

 
   
 1996  
Davidson's Honors College

Davidson’s Honors College

Gallagher Business Building

Gallagher Business Building

   
 1998  
James E. Todd Building

James E. Todd Building

Leland M. Yates Chemistry Stores

Leland M. Yates Chemistry Stores

   
 1999  
North Underground Lecture Hall

North Underground Lecture Hall

 
   
 2004  
Lewis and Clark Villages

Lewis and Clark Villages

 
   
 2005  
Bio Research Building

Bio Research Building

 
   
 2007  
Anderson Hall

Anderson Hall

 
   
 2009  
Interdisciplinary Science Building

Interdisciplinary Science Building

 
   
 2010    
Payne Family Native American Center

Payne Family Native American Center

 
   
 2016  

Harold and Priscilla Gilkey Building

Harold and Priscilla Gilkey Building

 

Campus Landmarks

Click on the landmarks listed below to see an image of each one and learn more about them.
Dornblaser Field
 
Grizzly Statue
 
Hello Walk
 
James H.T. Ryman Memorial Mall
 
Little Oval
 
M
 
Memorial Row
 
Mount Sentinel Lookout
 
Mount Sentinel Trail
 
Oval
 
Senior Bench
 
Spoony Rock
 

Current and Razed Buildings

The buildings in this list have been sorted alphabetically by the first letter of the building's title. Click on a letter listed below to navigate to that building. Example: Click on A to navigate to all buildings whose titles begin with the letter a.


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  R  S  T  U  V  W  Y

Aber Hall, 1967
Dormitory named for university Professor William Aber. Aber began teaching at UM in 1895 and passed away in 1919.

Adams Center, 1953 (1970 remodel, 2000 remodel-addition)
Originally called the Field House, it was renamed the Harry Adams Event Center 1998 and the Adams Center 1999. Harry Adams was a Professor of Physical Education and a coach at the university from 1925-1965.

Anderson Hall, 2007
Home to the School of Journalism and named for Montana native and Wisconsin publisher Don Anderson. In 1959, Anderson arranged for Lee Enterprises to buy many of the daily papers in Montana from the Anaconda Copper Mining Company.

Art Annex-Pool, 1958 (2000 remodel-addition)
Bio Research Building, 2005
Brantly Hall, 1923 (1961 addition)
Dormitory originally called North Hall, it was renamed Brantly Hall in 1955. Lois Reat Brantly served as a housemother and social director in the dormitory from 1923-1939.

Chemistry Building, 1939 (1951, 1981 and 2004 remodel-addition)
Clapp Building, 1971 (2008 remodel)
Originally called the Science Complex, it was renamed the Charles H. Clapp Building in 2005. Clapp served as president of the university from 1921-1935.

Clinical Psychology Center, 1983
Cook Hall, 1918-1965 - RAZED
Originally housed war-related projects and various departments. Named for Marcus Barrett Cook, first UM alumnus to die in World War I.

Corbin Hall, 1927 (1961 addition)
Originally served as a dormitory, it was named for Frances Corbin an early English professor at the university.

Craig Hall, 1953 (1956 addition, 1966 remodel)
Dormitory named for the first university president Oscar J. Craig who served from 1895-1908.

Craighead Apartments, 1957
Student housing complex named for university president Edwin B. Craighead who served from 1912-1915.

Curry Health Center, 1956 (1992 addition)
Originally called the Student Health Services it was renamed the Curry Health Center in 1999. Dr. Robert B. Curry was head of health services at the university from 1965-1990.

Davidson’s Honors College, 1996
Named for donors Ian B. and Nancy Preston Davidson.

Duniway Hall, 1956
Originally called Craig Hall Extension Two, it was renamed Duniway Hall in 1956. Clyde A. Duniway served as president of the university from 1908-1912.

Elliot Village, 1966
Married student housing complex named for Edward Charles Elliot who served as Chancellor of the Montana University System from 1916-1922.

Elrod Hall, 1923 (1962 remodel)
Originally called South Hall, it was renamed Elrod Hall in 1955. Morton J. Elrod came to the university in 1897 as head of the science department, he later headed the biology department and founded the museum of botany and zoology. Elrod suffered a stroke in 1934 and retired. He died in 1953.

Fine Arts Building, 1935 (1998 addition)
Originally built as the Student Union its was repurposed and renamed the Fine Arts Building in 1955. The theater attached to the building was originally called the University Theater. In 2012, it was renamed the George and Jane Dennison Theater.

Forestry Building, 1922
View the digitized architectural drawing of the building available on ScholarWorks.

Forestry Memorial Greenhouse, 1951
Dedicated the “Memorial Greenhouse” in honor of the students killed fighting the Mann Gulch Wildfire in 1949.

Forestry Shack, 1915-1935 - RAZED
The Forestry Shack was located behind Main Hall. When the College of Forestry and Conservation moved into their current home in 1922, the shack became the student store. The shack was torn down when the new student union opened.

Gallagher Business Building, 1996
Named for donors William and Rosemary Gallagher. William Gallagher graduated from the university in business administration in 1925.

Gym, 1903-1965 - RAZED
Original men’s gym. A large covered grandstand was built on the east side looking out over Dornblaser field. It served as the women’s gym from 1922-1957.

Harold and Priscilla Gilkey Building, 2016
Named for donors Harold and Priscilla Gilkey. In 1962 Harold graduated from the UM School of Business and Priscilla graduated in English. The building is home to the School of Business Center for Executive Education.

Health Sciences, 1961
Heating Plant, 1922 (1933 addition)
Home Economics Home Living Center, ca. 1921-1961 - RAZED
Located at 630 University Avenue, the university purchased the property in 1947 from the Alpha Xi Delta sorority and leased it to the Department of Home Economics soon after. The home was torn down to make room for the construction of Knowles Hall.

Ice Rink, 1956-1969 - RAZED
Located where the Art Annex stands today, the rink was demolished to make room for a larger ceramic studio.

Interdisciplinary Science Building, 2009
International Center, 1937
Originally called the Women’s Club-Art Building, in 1956 it was renamed the Scheuch Planetarium. The planetarium closed in 1968 and the building became the Alumni Center. In 1988 it was renamed the Continuing Education Building and in 2006 it became the International Center.

Jeannette Rankin Hall, 1908
From 1908-1922 the building was used as the campus library and from 1923-1948 it was home to the Law School. After 1948, the Psychology Department moved in followed by a series of changing tenants. The building was renamed Jeannette Rankin Hall in 1983. Jeannette Rankin graduated from the University of Montana in 1902. She was the first woman elected to the United States Congress. She served as Montana’s representative in the house from 1917-1919 and from 1941-1943. View the digitized architectural drawing of the building available on ScholarWorks.

Jesse Hall, 1967
Dormitory named for Dr. R.H. Jesse. From 1924-1954 Jesse served as professor and chair of the Chemistry Department. He also served as Dean of Men and Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. During his time at the university, he twice served as acting president.

Jumbo Hall, 1946-1964 - RAZED
Jumbo Hall was a prefabricated dormitory that was purchased from shipyards in Vancouver, Washington soon after World War II ended. The building served as a dormitory for men and was called Jumbo due to its large size.

Knowles Hall, 1963
Dormitory named for Eloise Knowles. Knowles was one of the two members of the university’s first graduating class in 1898 and the university’s first fine arts professor.

Law Building, 1961 (1979 addition, 1996 remodel, 1999 remodel, 2009 addition)
Leland M. Yates Chemistry Stores, 1998
Named for Leland M. Yates, an alumnus, who worked as professor of chemistry at the university for thirty-one years.

Lewis and Clark Villages, 2004
Liberal Arts Building, 1953 (1962 addition)
Originally intended to be called the Classroom Building, it was officially dedicated the Liberal Arts Building on January 10, 1954. The exterior mosaic is by Rudy Autio. In 2017, the south wing of the building was renovated with funds donated by Dennis and Gretchen Eck and was named Eck Hall.

Lommasson Center, 1955 (1957 addition, 1964 remodel, 1998 addition)
Originally called the Lodge, it was renamed the Emma B. Lommasson Center in 2001. Lommasson graduated from the university in 1929. In 1937 she returned to pursue a master's in math. In 1947, she became the university’s first veteran’s advisor and later worked as the assistant registrar. She retired in 1977.

Maureen and Mike Mansfield Library, 1973 (1978 addition)
Named for university alumni Mike Mansfield and his wife Maureen Mansfield. Mike Mansfield attended the university as an undergraduate and served in the United States House of Representatives from 1942-1952. He was elected to the senate in 1952 and represented Montana until 1977 when he was appointed Ambassador to Japan.

Math Building, 1903 (1927 remodel, 1947 remodel, 2007 addition)
Originally called Women’s Hall, it was renamed Craig Hall in 1911 and the Math Building in 1953.

McGill Hall, 1953 (2004 remodel, 2009 addition)
Originally called the Women’s Center, it was renamed McGill Hall in 1984. Named for Dr. Caroline McGill who in 1916 became the third female physician in Montana.

Miller Hall, 1965 (1996 remodel)
Named for J. Earl Burly Miller who served as Dean of Men for twenty years and chairmen of the division of social sciences.

Music Building, 1953
Natural Science Annex, 1938
Natural Science Building, 1918 (1958 remodel)
North Corbin Hall, 1956
Originally served as a dormitory. It was named for Frances Corbin an early English professor at the university.

North Underground Lecture Hall, 1999
Old Native American Studies, ca. 1918
Originally owned by the Berry Family. In 1929, it housed the local chapter of the Delta Delta Delta Sorority. In 1932, the home was sold to Wybren Hiemstra and in 1938 it was sold to the Tremper Family. The university purchased the home in 1957.

Pantzer Hall, 1995
Dormitory named for university president Robert T. Pantzer who served from 1966-1974.

PARTV (Performing Arts Radio Television) Building, 1983 (2009 addition)
Payne Family Native American Center, 2010
Named for the donors, the Payne Family. Terry Payne graduated from the university in 1963.

Phyllis J. Washington Education Center, 1950 (2009 addition-remodel)
Originally called the Business Administration and Education Building, it was renamed the Education Building in 1996 and the Phyllis J. Washington Education Center in 2009. Named for donor Phyllis J. Washington, who graduated from the university in 1964 with a Bachelor of Arts in Education.

Physical Plant, 1967
Prescott House, 1897 (1996 remodel)
The Prescott house is located at the base of Mount Sentinel and was originally built and owned by Clarence Prescott, Sr. In 1955, the home and adjacent orchards were sold to the university.

Schreiber Gym, 1921
Originally called the Men’s Gymnasium, the building was renamed Schreiber Gym in 1987. W.E. Schreiber was a professor of physical education at the university from 1917-1945.

Science Hall, 1898-1983 - RAZED
The Science Hall was one of the four original buildings that made up campus. It suffered tremendous damage in a fire in 1902 and was later renamed the Venture Center.

Simpkins Hall, 1918-1960 - RAZED
Originally a temporary barracks for SATC troops, the building served as the primary hospital on campus during the influenza epidemic. It was named for university student James Claude Simpkins who was killed in action overseas during World War I.

Sisson Apartments, 1957
Named for university president Edward O. Sisson who served from 1917-1921.

Skaggs-Pharmacy Building, 1981 (1999 addition, 2000 addition, 2007 addition)
Named for donors L.S. and Aline W. Skaggs who ran American Stores Company.

Social Sciences Building, 1921 (1955 addition)
Originally home to the campus library, the building was renamed Social Science in 1979.

Stone Hall, 1936
Originally called the Journalism Building, it was renamed Old Journalism in 2008. Then in 2011, it was renamed Stone Hall after Arthur L. Stone, the first dean of the University of Montana School of Journalism.

Student Recreation Center, 1972 (2001 remodel)
James E. Todd Building, 1998
Named for James E. Todd who served as the university’s vice president of administration and finance.

Turner Hall, 1937 (1947 addition)
Originally called New Hall, it was renamed Turner Hall in 1954. Named for Belle B. Turner who served as housemother and social director in Craig, Corbin and New Halls for many years.

University Center, 1968
2000 remodel

University-Main Hall, 1898
The first campus plan created in 1895 by engineering professor Dr. Frederick C. Scheuch labeled University Hall as Main Building. In 1898, the cornerstone for the building was laid and the ceremony invitation referred to the building as University Hall. A year later at the formal opening the building was dedicated University Hall. Over time, the term Main Hall has been used to refer to the building in correspondence and publications but the official name for the building has never been changed and remains University Hall. View the digitized architectural drawing of the building available on ScholarWorks.

Urey Lecture Hall, 1981
Named for Dr. Harold Clayton Urey. Dr. Urey graduated from the university in 1917 with a Bachelor of Science degree. He received his PhD in physical chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. In 1934, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for his discovery of deuterium the heavy isotope of hydrogen.

Veterans Education and Transition Building, 1970
Washington Grizzly Stadium, 1986
1995 addition, 2002 remodel, 2003 addition, 2007 addition
Named for donors Dennis and Phyllis Washington. Dennis is from Montana and founded Washington Corporation. Phyllis Washington attended the university and in 1964 received a Bachelor of Arts in Education.

Online Resources

Exhibits
Online exhibits created by the Archives and Special Collections contain excellent images and information about the university. Check out this one for information on buildings throughout the university’s history.


J.B. Speer Manuscript: Land for the Campus, 1955


J. B. Speer worked for the University of Montana (then called Montana State University) from 1905-1953, starting as student clerk and working up through business officer and controller. In his unpublished manuscript “Land for the Campus”, Speer provides information about acquisition of sites for expansion of the campus from its founding 40 acres to a campus of over 30 buildings. This is available online via ScholarWorks, and the rest of his papers are available to view in Archives and Special Collections. Link to the guide to the J.B. Speer Papers collection.


Oral History
In this oral history interview with Herbert Lee "Herb" Torgrimson, he discusses his career as a maintenance supervisor at the University of Montana. He details the physical workings of the utilities that keep the buildings functional and describing the building plans and visions for the campus. Torgrimson describes the buildings that were constructed and how they were constructed as well as the buildings that were razed and what methods were used to destroy them. This interview is available online via ScholarWorks (OH 270-044, 045).

In the Archives

Physical copies of the materials listed below are available in the Mansfield Library's Archives and Special Collections.

Manuscript Collections
Click on the links listed below to view a guide to an archival collection available in Archives and Special Collections. Each of these collections contains information about University of Montana athletics.


Facility Services Records
Facility Services is responsible for all construction and planning projects on campus. This includes historical resources like architectural drawings and plans. Archives and Special Collections has an assortment of drawings and plans from facility services. To learn more about these materials, visit Archives and Special Collections. Some of these plans and drawings have been digitized and are available to view on ScholarWorks: link to the University of Montana Architectural Drawings and Blueprints collection and link to the University of Montana Campus Plans and Maps collection.


Campus Plans


Campus plans are more than just intricate drawings showing the layout of the university. They have information about land purchases, private property, landscaping, building location and much more. Archives and Special Collections has campus plans from 1895 to 1971. To view the plans, visit Archives and Special Collections. Some of these plans and drawings have been digitized and are available to view on ScholarWorks.